Enthusiasm, Dedication & Commitment

Second Clubhouse

St. Charles History Poster - click to enlarge
A group of 23 prominent businessman gathered in 1904 to organize a country club outside the city of Winnipeg. In 1905, construction began on the clubhouse and a golf course, laid out by Tom Bendelow, seven miles west of the city on the banks of the Assiniboine River.

Before the year ended, the club had entertained the Governor-General of Canada, Earl Grey, and one of its members, Douglas Laird, had scored the first hole-in-one. It was an auspicious beginning to what would become an outstanding institution in the sporting and social life of the community.

The country club pioneered polo in Manitoba, hosting teams from Canada and the U.S. Croquet, steeple-chasing, tennis, cricket and trapshooting were also popular. But golf became the preference of members.

In 1919, world-famous course architect Donald Ross was brought to St. Charles to rebuild the original eighteen holes, the Ross Nine and the Woods Nine.

High mounds and steep slopes around bunkers and greens distinguish St. Charles, as they do more than 100 other Ross-designed courses.
Another renowned architect, Dr. Alister MacKenzie, famous for his designs at Royal Melbourne in Australia and Cypress Point in California, was hired in 1929 to layout the MacKenzie Nine. It opened in 1931, and the MacKenzie hallmark of blending the course into the natural terrain was incorporated into St. Charles.

It has been the Club's constant desire to maintain quality and improvements have been made through the years by noted Canadian architects Stanley Thompson, Norman Woods and Bill Robinson.

The country club has attracted leading business and professional people in Winnipeg. Enthusiasm for the game of golf, a spirit of friendship, consideration for family and an appreciation for a quality private club are the attributes shared by members of St. Charles.